***Vaccinations & Immunity***




    The tide has turned regarding yearly Vaccinations & Immunity... 
    The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Canine Vaccination Task Force has updated their vaccination guidelines for 2011. According to AAHAnet.org

    2011 AAHA (The American Animal Hospital Association)
    Canine Vaccination Guidelines  *CLICK HERE for the Full Info in PDF file*
    We also copied a "Vaccine Summary" below on this page: "SEE HERE"

    Developed in a manner consistent with best vaccination practices, the 2011 Guidelines include expert opinions supported by scientific study, published and unpublished documents, and encompass all canine vaccines currently licensed in the U.S. and Canada. The task force that developed the guidelines included experts in immunology, infectious diseases, internal medicine, law, and clinical practice. The absolute highlight is that all core vaccines with the exception of the 1-year rabies are now recommended at 3-year or greater intervals. Even more exciting is the task force has acknowledged that in the case of the non-rabies core vaccines, immunity lasts at least 5 years for distemper and parvo, and at least 7 years for adenovirus. Hopefully these new guidelines will help more dog owners understand the long-lasting effect of those puppy shots!

    This information is very important to all dog owners not just French Bulldog owners. Vaccines protocols have changed, they are NOT needed every year. Pet owners need to know this. The drug companies are profiting and it's our animals that are paying the price. I am NOT against vaccinations, I am against over-vaccinations and unnecessary vaccinations.  I believe the All Star Vaccine Protocol that I am using today is what works best for my dogs, do your research on what is best for yours.

    The American Veterinary Medical Association Committee report states that the one year revaccination recommendation frequently found on many vaccination labels is based on historical precedent, not scientific data'. Vaccine research shows unnecessary inoculations are given yearly to our animals. Humans don't get yearly vaccines for every disease we were vaccinated against as babies, why should our dogs?  Every breeder and pet owner will do what they feel comfortable with, but Numerous Studies have proved that over-vaccinations and non-core vaccinations do more harm than good. We added this page for those that haven't had the opportunity to read the studies that have been going on for years now. Advances in Human and Animal medicine are made everyday so keeping up with studies and researches is something we all need to do. Most Vets will not tell you any of the information you will read here because either A. they are uninformed themselves or B. Because they make lots of money giving unnecessary vaccinations to those pet owners that do not know any better. This is not a personal attack on any Vet out there PLEASE UNDERSTAND THIS, I love my Vet and we ALL need our Vets, but just like with human Dr's over prescribing medications, it's about money, there is a lot of money to be made and it is their business, period.

    We do NOT vaccinate our dogs yearly. What people have to understand, Vets included, is that this is not about money for people like me. I rather pay MORE for the vaccines that ARE needed, than pay less and have to vaccinate my dogs with "non-core vaccines" or have to  "re-vaccinate"  for diseases they already have immunity to because that's what the Vet tells you that you must do and if you refuse, you are many times not a welcomed client in that office anymore, it's happened to people I know. What people have to understand is that the only vaccine required by law for pet owners is the RABIES vaccine. All these other vaccines Vets want you to have or force you to have are optional. In other words, you CHOOSE what to give your pet and by doing your research you will know what it is that you should and should not vaccinate for and HOW OFTEN.

    I'm definitely not a tree hugging hippy that dances around my dogs and shakes pixy dust at them to ward off the evil bugs. I'm following the guidelines outlined by AAHA and the experts in the field after YEARS/DECADES of research. The vaccine manufacturers and the majority of Vets insist on annual boosters, but studies show protection for AT LEAST 3 years, many 7 years and many lifetime immunity. Why in the world would I feel comfortable pumping more of these poisons into my dogs systems when they are already immune to the diseases. I'm doing what I feel is right. I pay nearly triple what I would pay for the vaccinations to have "blood titers" done on my dogs to check their immunity, and I am willing to pay this before I vaccinate any of my dogs for no reason. Google "blood titers for dogs" so you can read about these tests and visit Dr Dodds website and read her "Reasons for Vaccine Titer Testing".

    Our purpose in sharing this information here and what we do is not to discourage anyone from vaccinating your dogs, but to encourage pet owners to make educated decisions concerning their health care.

    *EDUCATE YOURSELF, YOUR DOGS HEALTH DEPENDS ON YOU*
    !!!KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!!!


    One quote I find so honorable, written by a slew of UK Vets. "Article Here"
    The oath we take as newly-qualified veterinary surgeons is 'to help, or at least do no harm'. We wish to maintain our position within society, and be deserving of the trust placed in us as a profession. It is therefore our contention that those who continue to give annual vaccinations in the light of new evidence may well be acting contrary to the welfare of the animals committed to their care.

    We have done our research and suggest you do yours. 
    Look up two of the experts in the field:

    Dr. Ronald D. Schultz of the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine
    Dr. Schultz is one of the preeminent experts in the field of veterinary vaccines.  Schultz, professor and chair of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has been studying the effectiveness of canine vaccines since the 1970s; he's learned that immunity can last as long as a dog's lifetime, which suggests that our "best friends" are being over-vaccinated.

     Dr. Jean  Dodds. She is a world renowned research immunologist. 
    Dr. Jean Dodd's address and more information can be found at: ItsForTheAnimals.com - "Dr. Jean Dodd's is the owner of *Hemopeet /Hemolife* the world's largest non-profit blood bank for dogs. Dr. Dodd's specializes in immunology. Her puppy vaccination protocol can be found all over the net, but please NOTE her protocol has been revised. Jean Dodds, DVM, is an internationally recognized authority on thyroid issues in dogs and blood diseases in animals.  In the mid-1980's she founded Hemopet, the first nonprofit blood bank for animals. Dr. Dodds is a grantee of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and author of over 150 research publications.  Through Hemopet she provides canine blood components and blood-bank supplies throughout North America, consults in clinical pathology, and lectures worldwide."

    Interesting Links by a Vet I look up to:
     


***All Star Vaccine Schedule***

What we use to vaccinate our French Bulldogs. No Lyme - No Lepto and No Coronavirus shots should be given to Frenchies, ever. They can kill your dog. 
I do not force or tell anyone what protocol to use. If you want my personal opinion, I believe the protocols from Dr. Ronald D. Schultz & Dr Dodds, the experts are best and I do what I can with the Vets I have. We vaccinate our puppies and give a booster at a year old. If you test titers 2 weeks after a parvo and/or distemper vaccine, you will know if the puppy/dog had an immunizing response. You don't need to guess. As Dr Dodds recommends we: "Perform vaccine antibody titers for distemper and parvovirus every three years thereafter, or more often, if desired. Vaccinate for rabies virus according to the law, except where circumstances indicate that a written waiver needs to be obtained from the primary care veterinarian.  In that case, a rabies antibody titer can also be performed to accompany the waiver request."

Any info obtained on this page is not to be construed as medical or legal advice. 
***The decision to vaccinate or not is yours and yours alone***


What we use to vaccinate OUR French Bulldogs.  What you do with YOURS is up to YOU.
Note: Unfortunately most Vets use COMBO vaccines and not just the "Parvo/Distemper" vaccine.  The 5 way shot is usually what is given... it  has Parvo, Distemper, Adenovirus, Hepatitis and Parainfluenza. Only 3 of these are "CORE" vaccines, but most Conventional Vets just do not carry any vaccines with less than this.  We suggest you NEVER give more than a "5 way shot". DO not ever let them give your puppy a 7 or 8 way vaccine and tell you that you HAVE TO... NOT TRUE. Those 7-8 way shots contain even more non-core vaccines like Lepto and Corona, which are NOT needed and they can be lethal as mentioned, to the more sensitive brachycephalic breeds like French Bulldogs. Ask to see the vial of the vaccine if necessarty....  TELL THEM WHAT YOU WANT AS SOON AS YOU WALK IN... MAKE SURE YOU KNOW WHAT EXACTLY IS BEING INJECTED. They will tell you it's a booster, but that can mean MANY DIFFERENT THINGS.......  Do not vaccinate SICK DOGS... do not vaccinate dogs about to have surgery, this will just further surpress the immune system. I never understand when I hear someone took a dog with a problem to the Vet, whether minor such as a skin hotspot or skin allergy or something severe as the dog being actually sick and hear that they vaccinated this dog... this is just cruel. Dogs also about to go into surgery should not be vaccinated, this is absurd, they are about to be put under general anesthesia, which can be lethal, why inject them with a vaccine first? It's all about common sense people. 

Puppy Shots:

  • [1st puppy shot] Distemper/Parvo 8-9 wks old]
  • [2nd puppy shot] Distemper/Parvo 3 wks later (11-12 wks old]
  • [3rd puppy shot] Distemper/Parvo 4 wks later (15-16 wks old) 
  • [1st Rabies Shot] [KILLED Vaccine] at 5-6 months old     
NOTE: Always give the Rabies Vaccine about 1-2 MONTHS AFTER  any distemper/parvovirus booster. I can't stress that enough. Most Vets we have come in contact with do NOT suggest this. My "frenchie families" get pressured when the last puppy booster is given they also want to give the rabies... NO... DO NOT DO THIS. Stand your ground, it's your CHOICE what your puppy gets.  Most Vets  will vaccinate your puppy with every vaccine under the sun on the SAME DAY... this is NOT what you want done. If you give multiple vaccines the SAME DAY and your puppy/dog has a reaction you will no idea what they had a reaction to.... COMMON SENSE

Most Vets will get upset if you tell them NOT to do this or they'll give you that "who do you think you are look" or they will tell you they do it all the time and it doesn't matter, but it does...  Many Vet Offices, not just Vets, but Vet Techs also and even the front desk ladies who answer the telephones, use scare tactics on pet owners... they mandate early spay/neuter before a puppy is even grown, they mandate unnecessary shots or multiple shots on the same day... Pet owners not knowing any better feel pressured or like bad owners if they go against the Vet Office... PEOPLE PLEASE... I have nothing to gain by writing and suggesting these things, I only have the dogs best interest in mind. Do your research and use some common sense. No one is saying NOT to vaccinate, just space them out and do not OVER-VACCINATE. What you do with your dogs is YOUR CHOICE... please do not feel pressured. There are great Vets around who will work with you.... If you feel pressured or your Vet gets mad GO TO ANOTHER ONE... It's YOUR dog, it's YOUR decision what goes into their body. BE THEIR VOICE!!!! 

Parvo/Distemper "YEARLY" Boosters: There is not such thing needed... "yearly" boosters are a THING OF THE PAST. Read above, protocols have changed, even if most Vets do not inform owners of this. 

  • 1st Booster for Parvo/Distemper is given1 year after last puppy shot- Approx 15-16 months old. 
  • Again no YEARLY shots are needed. I will run "blood titers" on the dogs to check for immunity at around 18 months old to make sure they are covered. A titer is the blood level that shows what immunity is still in your dogs body for that certain vaccine. As humans we do not get yearly shots, neither should our dogs.
  • At 5 years old I may vaccinate with Parvo/Distemper or a "5 way shot" and they are done for life. This means in total if I have a dog live to be 14 years old, that dog received maybe 5 vaccines in it's entire life. 3 puppy shots and possible 2 boosters... that's it. I do not vaccinate my dogs after 5-6 years old at the latest.  I just had blood titers run on a 12.5 year old dog that had not had a Parvo/Dsitemper vaccine in almost 8 years and guess what? The dog was still immune, go figure, all the studies are true :)
Rabies Boosters:  Also no such thing as a YEARLY shot needed for this.  The vaccines are the same, nothing has changed, just the law is finaly realizing that yearly vaccines are not needed. The 1 year and 3 year vaccines are EXACTLY the same, it's just what certificate/tag the Vet decides to issue and again, the owner needs to be educated on this and demand what they want.
  • We give the Rabies booster 1 year after first rabies shot and then every 3 years """According to Law in your County"""" which as far as I know it's now every 3 years everywhere...NOT YEARLY!!!  Hopefully even the 3 year law will change soon because the vaccine lasts longer in the body:  www.rabieschallengefund.org/


***WE DO NOT EVER GIVE LEPTOSPIROSIS VACCINE, LYME OR CORONA VACCINE TO OUR DOGS. BORDATELLA VACCINE IS ALSO UNNECESSARY*.
These are not core vaccines, they are not needed, the risks definitely outweigh the benefits. There are so many strains to the diseases that the vaccines do not cover anyway.... Please do your research.  Again... most Vets do not tell you this and again, nothing personal against any Vet, I am just stating facts and what I deal with over and over again, with my Vets and the Vets my "frenchie families" take their puppies to. You have more of a chance of your dog having a reaction and dying from a Lepto, Lyme or Corona Vaccine than the dog actually contracting the disease. I have not vaccinated my dogs for these since I almost lost 2 dogs to anaphalectic shock due to these vaccines and that was over 12 years ago. My dogs have never contracted any disease I have not vaccinated for.  *Bordetella is optional. Vets give it to puppies not being boarded, they insist they HAVE TO in order to give you a Health Certificate and why our puppies get it when they go in to get their Health Certs. The Vets will NOT issue a Health Certificate without one.  In 20 years of owning dogs I have dealth with kennel cough ONCE and it was because one of my males, who was out on the road with a handler SHOWING for his AKC Championship, brought the virus back with him from the show and infected my others. It's not fun to hear your dogs coughing, but it's a cold, like us himans get and must run it's course. I will continue to NOT vaccinate for kennel cough though.... no sense on continuing to vaccinate for this disease that has so many strains that the vaccines do not cover anyway. I can go on and on... Just do your reseach, I can't stress that enough. 

By: All Star

As I said there are great Vets around... this Dr. Becker is just one of them, see her Videos Below:


 
*Dog and Cat Vaccines are Not Harmless Preventive Medicine*

 *The Truth About Pet Vaccines*


 

 

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By: Dr. Jean Dodds'

CANINE VACCINATION PROTOCOL
MINIMAL VACCINE USE
W. Jean Dodds, DVM
HEMOPET - reprinted from: http://www.itsfortheanimals.com

Note: The following vaccine protocol is offered for those dogs where minimal vaccinations are advisable or desirable.  The schedule is one I recommend and should not interpreted to mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be less satisfactory.  It's a matter of professional judgment and choice.

9 - 10 weeks Distemper + Parvovirus, MLV (e.g. Intervet  Progard Puppy DPV)
14 weeks Same as above
16 -18 weeks  (optional)  Same as above  (optional) 
20 weeks or older, if allowable by law  Rabies 
1 year Distemper + Parvovirus, MLV
1 year Rabies, killed 3-year product (give 3-4 weeks apart from distemper/parvovirus booster)

Perform vaccine antibody titers for distemper and parvovirus every three years thereafter, or more often, if desired. Vaccinate for rabies virus according to the law, except where circumstances indicate that a written waiver needs to be obtained from the primary care veterinarian.  In that case, a rabies antibody titer can also be performed to accompany the waiver request.  See www.rabieschallengefund.org                                                W Jean Dodds DVM.

A thought-provoking article by Dr.. Jean Dodds, provides valuable information regarding making informed decisions about vaccinating your animal companion and is listed at the link below:
****CHANGING VACCINE PROTOCOLS****
The challenge to produce effective and safe vaccines for the prevalent infectious diseases of humans and animals has become increasingly difficult. In veterinary medicine, evidence implicating vaccines in triggering immune-mediated and other chronic disorders (vaccinosis) is compelling.  While some of these problems have been traced to contaminated or poorly attenuated batches of vaccine that revert to virulence, others apparently reflect the host’s genetic predisposition to react adversely upon receiving the single (monovalent) or multiple antigen “combo” (polyvalent) products given routinely to animals. Animals of certain susceptible breeds or families appear to be at increased risk for severe and lingering adverse reactions to vaccines. 

The onset of adverse reactions to conventional vaccinations (or other inciting drugs, chemicals, or infectious agents) can be an immediate hypersensitivity or anaphylactic reaction, or can occur acutely (24-48 hours afterwards), or later on (10-45 days) in a delayed type immune response often caused by immune-complex formation. Typical signs of adverse immune reactions include fever, stiffness, sore joints and abdominal tenderness, susceptibility to infections, central and peripheral nervous system disorders or inflammation, collapse with autoagglutinated red blood cells and jaundice, or generalized pinpoint hemorrhages or bruises.  Liver enzymes may be markedly elevated, and liver or kidney failure may accompany bone marrow suppression. 

Dr. Jean Dodds' latest vaccination protocol (2011) for dogs and cats along with other articles
http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/DODDS-CHG-VACC-PROTOCOLS.HTM

Reasons for Vaccine Titer Testing: 

1. To determine that animal is protected (suggested by a positive test result).

2. To identify a susceptible animal (suggested by a negative test result).

3. To determine whether an individual animal has responded to a vaccine.

4. To determine whether an individual vaccine is effectively immunizing animals.

 * from: Schultz RD, Ford RB, Olsen J, Scott F. Titer testing and vaccination: a new look at traditional practices. Vet Med, 97: 1-13, 2002 (insert).

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Dr Ronald Schultz

Once a year, Ronald Schultz checks the antibody levels in his dogs' blood. Why? He says for proof that most annual vaccines are unnecessary.

Schultz, professor and chair of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has been studying the effectiveness of canine vaccines since the 1970s; he's learned that immunity can last as long as a dog's lifetime, which suggests that our "best friends" are being over-vaccinated.

Based on his findings, a community of canine vaccine experts has developed new veterinary recommendations that could eliminate a dog's need for annual shots. The guidelines appear in the March/April issue of Trends, the journal of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA).

Every year, when we take our dogs to the veterinarian's office, they could receive up to 16 different vaccines, many of which are combined into a single shot. Four of these products protect against life-threatening diseases, including rabies, canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2); the rest protect against milder diseases to which only some dogs are exposed, including Lyme disease. But, as many veterinarians are realizing, over-vaccination can actually jeopardize a dog's health and even life. Side effects can cause skin problems, allergic reactions and autoimmune disease. Though the case in cats, not dogs, tumors have been reported at the site of vaccine injections. "These adverse reactions have caused many veterinarians to rethink the issue of vaccination," says Schultz. "The idea that unnecessary vaccines can cause serious side effects is in direct conflict with sound medical practices."

For 30 years, Schultz has been examining the need to vaccinate animals so often and for so many diseases. "In the 1970s, I started thinking about our immune response to pathogens and how similar it is in other animals," says Schultz. "That's when I started to question veterinary vaccination practices." Just like ours, a canine's immune system fires up when a pathogen,like a virus, enters the body. The pathogen releases a protein called an antigen, which calls into action the immune system's special disease-fighting cells. Called B and T lymphocytes, these cells not only destroy the virus, but they remember what it looked like so they can fend it off in the future. It's this immunological memory that enables vaccines, which purposely contain live, weakened or dead pathogens, to protect against future disease. But, as Schultz points out, vaccines can keep people immune for a lifetime: we're usually inoculated for measles, mumps and rubella as children but never as adults. So, can dogs be vaccinated as pups and then never again?

While evidence from Schultz's studies on both his own dogs and many other dogs from controlled studies suggests the answer is yes, Schultz recommends a more conservative plan based on duration of immunity and individual risk. Schultz says that core vaccines, or the ones that protect against life-threatening disease, are essential for all dogs, yet he does not recommend dogs receive these shots yearly. "With the exception of rabies, the vaccines for CDV, CPV-2 and CAV trigger an immunological memory of at least seven years," he explains. (Studies testing the duration of immunity for rabies shots show it lasts about three years.) For these reasons, Schultz suggests that dogs receive rabies shots every three years (as is required by law in most states) and the other core vaccines no more frequently than every three years. Some non-core vaccines, on the other hand, have a much shorter duration of immunity, lasting around one year. But, as Schultz points out, not every dog should get these types of vaccines, because not every dog is at risk for exposure. 

Today, many vaccinated dogs receive a shot for Lyme disease. However, Schultz says that the ticks carrying the Lyme disease pathogen can be found in only a few regions of the United States. More importantly, Schultz adds, "The vaccine can cause adverse effects such as mild arthritis, allergy or other immune diseases. Like all vaccines, it should only be used when the animal is at significant risk." He notes that the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine rarely administers the Lyme disease vaccine.

Another common vaccine that Schultz says is unnecessary protects against "kennel cough," an often mild and transient disease contracted during boarding or dog shows. "Most pet dogs that do not live in breeding kennels, are not boarded, do not go to dog shows and have only occasional contact with dogs outside their immediate family," Schultz recommends, "rarely need to be vaccinated or re-vaccinated for kennel cough." Schultz says that it's important for veterinarians to recognize an individual dog's risk for developing a particular disease when considering the benefits of a vaccine. "Vaccines have many exceptional benefits, but, like any drug, they also have the potential to cause significant harm." Giving a vaccine that's not needed, he explains, creates an unnecessary risk to the animal. 

Recommending that dogs receive fewer vaccines, Schultz admits, may spark controversy, especially when veterinarians rely on annual vaccines to bring in clients, along with income. But, as he mentions, annual visits are important for many reasons other than shots. "Checking for heartworm, tumors, dermatological problems and tooth decay should be done on a yearly basis," he says. "Plus, some dogs, depending on their risk, may need certain vaccines annually." Rather than vaccinating on each visit, veterinarians can use a recently developed test which checks dogs' immunity against certain diseases. Schultz adds that veterinarians who have switched to the three-year, instead of annual, vaccination program have found no increase in the number of dogs with vaccine-preventable diseases. "Everyday, more and more people in the profession are embracing the change," notes Schultz. And, that the new vaccination guidelines supported by the AAHA, along with the task force members representing the American Colleges of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Veterinary Microbiology and the American Association of Veterinary Immunologists, is evidence of just that.

 
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**Rabies Vaccine Challenge Fund***
New studies coming out show that the rabies vaccine is proving to be good for up to 7 years . Hopefully this will be approved soon and cities and counties will adapt this protocol rather than try to make money off the dogs with the license fees and tags by forcing owners to vaccinate every year. Luckily in most places now they accept the 3 year tag and hopefully soon the 7 year one. It's not about the money for us owners, I rather pay $100 more for each vaccine , it's about not re-vaccinating a dog who is already immune to the diseases.
About the Rabies Challenge Fund: www.rabieschallengefund.org/
USDA Forces Dog Lovers to Foot the Bill of Rabies Study 
http://www.naturalnews.com/022525.html
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[Back To Top]

*Summary of New AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines for 2011*
The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Canine Vaccination Task Force has updated their vaccination guidelines for 2011. According to AAHAnet.org:

Developed in a manner consistent with best vaccination practices, the 2011 Guidelines include expert opinions supported by scientific study, published and unpublished documents, and encompass all canine vaccines currently licensed in the U.S. and Canada. The task force that developed the guidelines included experts in immunology, infectious diseases, internal medicine, law, and clinical practice. I'm encouraged by, if not blissful about the new guidelines. The absolute highlight is that all core vaccines with the exception of the 1-year rabies are now recommended at 3-year or greater intervals. Even more exciting is the task force has acknowledged that in the case of the non-rabies core vaccines, immunity lasts at least 5 years for distemper and parvo, and at least 7 years for adenovirus. Hopefully these new guidelines will help more dog owners understand the long-lasting effect of those puppy shots! And hopefully, more dog owners will now request titers rather than automatically revaccinating their canine companions for distemper, parvo and adenovirus.

CORE VACCINES (necessary total of 4, that's it)
Opinions By: Dr Becker,   info from AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines PDF form.
 

Canine Distemper (CDV)
Initial vaccination in puppies < 16 weeks of age

  •  •Starting at 6-8 weeks, vaccinate every 3 to 4 weeks (6, 10, 14 or 8, 12, 16 weeks) up to 14 or 16 weeks; final shot should be given between 14 and 16 weeks to minimize risk of maternal antibody interference 
Initial vaccination in dogs > 16 weeks of age
  •  •One dose 
Revaccination
  • •For puppies who received initial vaccination series by 16 weeks, a booster no later than 1 year after completion of initial series, then ? 3 years thereafter 
  • •For dogs who received initial vaccination after 16 weeks of age, every ? 3 years thereafter 
Notes: Among healthy dogs, distemper vaccines are expected to induce immunity for at least 5 years.
 

Canine Parvo (CPV-2)
Initial vaccination in puppies < 16 weeks of age

  •  •Starting at 6-8 weeks, vaccinate every 3 to 4 weeks (6, 10, 14 or 8, 12, 16 weeks) up to 14 or 16 weeks; final shot should be given between 14 and 16 weeks to minimize risk of maternal antibody interference 
Initial vaccination in dogs > 16 weeks of age
  •  •One dose 
Revaccination
  •  •For puppies who received initial vaccination series by 16 weeks, a booster no later than 1 year after completion of initial series, then ? 3 years thereafter 
  • •For dogs who received initial vaccination after 16 weeks of age, every ? 3 years thereafter 
Notes: Among healthy dogs, distemper vaccines are expected to induce immunity for at least 5 years.
 
 

Canine Adenovirus (CAV-2)

Initial vaccination in puppies < 16 weeks of age

  •  •Starting at 6-8 weeks, vaccinate every 3 to 4 weeks (6, 10, 14 or 8, 12, 16 weeks) up to 14 or 16 weeks; final shot should be given between 14 and 16 weeks to minimize risk of maternal antibody interference 
Initial vaccination in dogs > 16 weeks of age
  •  •One dose 
Revaccination
  •  •For puppies who received initial vaccination series by 16 weeks, a booster no later than 1 year after completion of initial series, then ? 3 years thereafter 
  • •For dogs who received initial vaccination after 16 weeks of age, every ? 3 years thereafter 
Notes: Among healthy dogs, distemper vaccines are expected to induce immunity for at least 7 years.
 
 

Rabies 1-year

Initial vaccination in puppies < 16 weeks of age

  •  •One dose not earlier than 12 weeks or as required by law 
Initial vaccination in dogs > 16 weeks of age
  •  •One dose 
Revaccination
 •For all dogs: annually as required by law 

Rabies 3-year

Initial vaccination in puppies < 16 weeks of age

  •  •One dose not earlier than 12 weeks or as required by law 
Initial vaccination in dogs > 16 weeks of age
 •One dose 

Revaccination

  •  •For all dogs: within 1 year of initial dose regardless of age at time of initial dose, then every 3 years thereafter as required by law 
Non-CORE VACCINES (not needed)

Measles Vaccine (MV)

This vaccine is supposed to provide temporary immunization of young puppies against distemper by 'cross-protecting' them against the disease in the event there are still maternally derived antibodies present. It is always given in combination with other vaccines – distemper plus measles, or a 4-way combination of distemper plus measles plus adenovirus plus parainfluenza.

It is only recommended for healthy dogs between 6 and 12 weeks of age.
 
 

Canine Parainfluenza (CPiV)

There are two delivery systems for this vaccine – intranasal and parenteral (injected).

This is a flu vaccine. The intranasal form prevents clinical signs of illness, infection and shedding. The injected form prevents clinical illness, but not infection or shedding. It is used for dogs that aggressively resist intranasal delivery.

The parenteral vaccine is always given in combination with certain core vaccines; the intranasal form is always given in combination with the bordetella vaccine alone, or with bordetella plus adenovirus. 

It is always given in a single dose. Revaccination recommendations, depending on the form of the vaccine (intranasal or parenteral), are per the combined core vaccine schedule, annually, or more frequently for 'high risk' animals. 
 

Bordetella (Bb) Vaccine

The bordetella vaccine can also be delivered intranasally or by injection.

Parenteral administration requires two doses, 2 to 4 weeks apart. For the initial vaccination, it is recommended the second dose be given at least a week before the dog is boarded, attends a dog show, etc. Revaccination is recommended annually

The intranasal vaccine is single dose, with revaccination recommended annually or more often for 'high risk' dogs. Some dogs experience side effects for 3 to 10 days after vaccination, including coughing, sneezing and nasal discharge.
 
 

Canine Adenovirus (CAV-2) – Intranasal
 

The intranasal form of the adenovirus vaccine is a non-core vaccine.

It's recommended for dogs at risk for respiratory infection caused by the adenovirus, and it may not provide immunity against canine hepatitis. It should not be considered a replacement for the injectable form of the vaccine.

This vaccine is available only in combination with the intranasal bordetella and parainfluenza vaccines.

Canine Influenza

Vaccine is given in two doses, 2 to 4 weeks apart, in dogs older than 6 weeks. Annual revaccination is recommended.
 
 

Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease)
 

Vaccine is given in two doses, 2 to 4 weeks apart, in dogs older than 12 weeks of age. Revaccination is recommended annually and/or at the beginning of tick season as determined regionally.

Notes: Recommended only for use in dogs with known risk of exposure, living in or visiting regions where exposure risk is high or where Lyme disease is endemic. Tick control products are required in addition to the vaccine.
 
 

Leptospira interrogans (Lepto or Leptospirosis)
 

This refers to the 4-way killed whole cell or subunit bacterin. The 2-way killed bacterin form of this vaccine is not recommended.

Vaccine is given in two doses, 2 to 4 weeks apart, in dogs older than 12 weeks of age.  Revaccination is recommended annually, but only for dogs with reasonable risk of exposure.

Notes: Vaccination should be based on known geographic occurrence/prevalence and exposure risk of the individual dog.
 
 

Canine Oral Melanoma

This vaccine is only available for treatment of dogs with malignant melanoma. It is not intended for the prevention of oral melanoma.
 
 

Crotalus atrox (Western Diamondback rattlesnake vaccine) (toxoid)

Field efficacy and experimental challenge data in dogs are not available at this time. (Vaccine efficacy and dose recommendations are based on toxin neutralization studies conducted in mice.)
 
 

Canine Coronavirus (CCov) (often just called Corona)

This vaccine is not recommended. Neither the modified live nor the killed CCov vaccine has proved effective against combination coronavirus/parvo disease. Only the parvo vaccine is protective against dual viruses.
 
 





What Dr. Ron Schultz Recommends:
For those of you not familiar with Dr. Schultz, I recommend you watch my 4-part video series with him. You can find links to all 4 videos and articles here. http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011/06/21/expert-proof-most-pets-are-vaccinated-way-too-often.aspx

Dr. Schultz is one of the preeminent experts in the field of veterinary vaccines. If you read the full AAHA vaccination guidelines report, you'll see his work referenced throughout.

Dr. Schultz recommends not starting a puppy or kitten core vaccination program before 6 to 8 weeks of age, with revaccinations no more frequent than every 4 weeks. So for example, if you start the program at 8 weeks, you would give another dose of the core vaccines at 12 weeks, and the third dose at 16 weeks.

Dr. Schultz's core vaccine protocol for his own family's pets differs in that he actually runs antibody titers on the mother to know exactly when the best time is to effectively immunize the puppy or kitten for the 3 core viruses. Then he titers the little ones 2 or more weeks after the vaccine, and as long as the response is adequate, he doesn't in most cases revaccinate for the rest of the pet's life. 

When it comes to rabies vaccines, Dr. Schultz gives the first vaccine after 4 months of age, revaccinates in a year, and then again in 3 years and every 3 years thereafter. In other words, he follows the law for 3-year rabies vaccines, even though he doesn't believe a vaccination every 3 years is necessary for immunization.

Currently Dr. Schultz is in year 4 of a 7-year study of the rabies vaccine. You can read more about the study at the Rabies Challenge Fund. His goal is to be able to recommend that after an animal is vaccinated at from 12 to 24 weeks for rabies, there's no need for re-vaccination every 3 years.

Hopefully we'll see the results of his 7-year study reflected in a future revision of the AAHA's canine vaccination guidelines, as well as in state and local laws.
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011/10/27/new-canine-vaccination-guidelines.aspx
 

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All this info is nothing new... this has been around for years.... just one article from years ago and from another Country:
 
 

Vets in UK speak against annual shots - Veterinary Times, UK - late January 2004

In JAVMA in 1995, Smith notes that 'there is evidence that some vaccines provide immunity beyond one year. In fact, according to research there is no proof that many of the yearly vaccinations are necessary and that protection in many instances may be life long'; also, 'Vaccination is a potent medical procedure with both benefits and risks for the patient'; further that, 'Revaccination of patients with sufficient immunity does not add measurably to their disease resistance, and may increase their risk of adverse post-vaccination events.'

Finally, he states that: 'Adverse events may be associated with the antigen, adjuvant, carrier, preservative or combination thereof. Possible adverse events include failure to immunise, anaphylaxis,immunosuppression, autoimmune disorders, transient infections and/or long-term infected carrier states.'

The report of the American Animal Hospital Association Canine Vaccine Taskforce in JAAHA (39 March/April 2003) is also interesting reading: 'Current knowledgte supports the statement that no vaccine is always safe, no vaccine is always protective and no vaccine is always indicated'; 'Misunderstanding, misinformation and the conservative nature of our profession have largely slowed adoption of protocols advocating decreased frequency of vaccination'; 'Immunological memory provides durations of immunity for core infectious diseases that far exceed the traditional recommendations for annual vaccination. This is supported by a growing body of veterinary information as well as well-developed epidemiological vigilance in human medicine that indicates immunity induced by vaccination is extremely long lasting and, in most cases, lifelong.'

Further, the evidence shows that the duration of immunity for rabies vaccine, canine distemper vaccine, canine parvovirus vaccine, feline panleukopaenia vaccine, feline rhinotracheitis and feline calicivurus have all been demonstrated to be a minimum of seven years, by serology for rabies and challenge studies for all others.

The veterinary surgeons below fully accept that no single achievement has had greater impact on the lives and well-being of our patients, our clients and our ability to prevent infectious diseases than the developments in annual vaccines. We, however, fully support the recommendations and guidelines of the American Animal Hospitals Association Taskforce, to reduce vaccine protocols for dogs and cats such that booster vaccinations are only given every three years, and only for core vaccines unless otherwise scientifically justified.

We further suggest that the evidence currently available will soon lead to the following facts being accepted:

* The immune systems of dogs and cats mature fully at six months and any modified live virus (MLV) vaccine given after that age produces immunity that is good for the life of that pet.
* If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first vaccine neutralise the antigens from the subsequent so there is little or no effect; the pet is not 'boosted', nor are more memory cells induced.

* Not only are annual boosters for canine parvovirus and distemper unnecessary, they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia.
* There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for annual administration of MLV vaccines.
* Puppies and kittens receive antibodies through their mothers' milk. This natural protection can last eight to 14 weeks.
* Puppies and kittens should NOT be vaccinated at less than eight weeks. Maternal immunity will neutralise the vaccine and little protection will be produced.
* Vaccination at six weeks will, however, DELAY the timing of the first effective vaccine.
* Vaccines given two weeks apart SUPPRESS rather than stimulate the immune system.

This would give possible new guidelines as follows:
1. A series of vaccinations is given starting at eight weeks of age (or preferably later) and given three to four weeks apart, up to 16 weeks of age.
2. One further booster is given sometime after six months of age and will then provide life-long immunity.

In light of data now available showing the needless use and potential harm of annual vaccination, we call on our profession to cease the policy of annual vaccination.
Can we wonder that clients are losing faith in vaccination and researching the issue themselves? We think they are right to do so. Politics, tradition or the economic well-being of veterinary surgeons and pharmaceutical companies should not be a factor in making medical decisions.
It is accepted that the annual examination of a pet is advisable. We undervalue ourselves, however, if we hang this essential service on the back of vaccination and will ultimately suffer the consequences. Do we need to wait until we see actions against vets, such as those launched in the state of Texas by Dr Robert Rogers? He asserts that the present practice of marketing vaccinations for companion animals constitutes fraud by misrepresentation, fraud by silence and theft by deception.

The oath we take as newly-qualified veterinary surgeons is 'to help, or at least do no harm'. We wish to maintain our position within society, and be deserving of the trust placed in us as a profession. It is therefore our contention that those who continue to give annual vaccinations in the light of new evidence may well be acting contrary to the wefare of the animals committed to their care.

Yours faithfully,
 
Richard Allport, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Sue Armstrong, MA BVetMed, MRCVS
 Mark Carpenter, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Sarah Fox-Chapman, MS, DVM, MRCVS
 Nichola Cornish, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Tim Couzens, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Chris Day, MA, VetMB, MRCVS
 Claire Davies, BVSc, MRCVS
 Mark Elliott, BVSc, MRCVS
 Peter Gregory, BVSc, MRCVS
 Lise Hansen, DVM, MRCVS
 John Hoare, BVSc, MRCVS
 Graham Hines, BVSc, MRCVS
 Megan Kearney, BVSc, MRCVS
 Michelle L'oste Brown, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Suzi McIntyre, BVSc, MRCVS
 Siobhan Menzies, BVM&S, MRCVS
 Nazrene Moosa, BVSc, MRCVS
 Mike Nolan, BVSc, MRCVS
 Richard Allport, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Sue Armstrong, MA BVetMed, MRCVS
 Mark Carpenter, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Sarah Fox-Chapman, MS, DVM, MRCVS
 Nichola Cornish, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Tim Couzens, BVetMed, MRCVS
Chris Day, MA, VetMB, MRCVS
 Claire Davies, BVSc, MRCVS
 Mark Elliott, BVSc, MRCVS
 Peter Gregory, BVSc, MRCVS
 Lise Hansen, DVM, MRCVS
 John Hoare, BVSc, MRCVS
 Graham Hines, BVSc, MRCVS
 Megan Kearney, BVSc, MRCVS
 Michelle L'oste Brown, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Suzi McIntyre, BVSc, MRCVS
 Siobhan Menzies, BVM&S, MRCVS
 Nazrene Moosa, BVSc, MRCVS
 Mike Nolan, BVSc, MRCVS
 Ilse Pedler, MA, VetMB, BSc, MRCVS
 John Saxton, BVetMed, MRCVS
 Cheryl Sears, MVB, MRCVS
 Jane Seymour, BVSc, MRCVS
 Christine Shields, BVSc, MRCVS
 Suzannah Stacey, BVSc, MRCVS
 Phillip Stimpson, MA, VetMB, MRCVS
 Nick Thompson, BSc, BVM&S, MRCVS
 Lyn Thompson, BVSc, MRCVS
 Wendy Vere, VetMB, MA, MRCVS
 Anuska Viljoen, BVSc, MRCVS, and
 Wendy Vink, BVSc, MRCVS

Vaccination Protocol - Are Vaccines safe for my french bulldogs? French Bulldog Vaccination Schedule

 

All Star Disclaimer: We do not claim to be veterinarians & by listing any information on this page we are not giving medical advice. We do not claim that the information herein will guarantee that this correct with anyone else's French Bulldog. Please do not use these links to attempt to diagnose or treat your pet. A licensed veterinarian is the best source of health advice for an individual pet. Remember that different veterinarians often disagree about the best treatments for pets. There are often several perfectly acceptable ways to treat the same condition. Just find the right Vet and ask a lot of questions!!!! We place these articles here for the public to read, as information, not FACTS. We found this information online, through web sites and other sources of information and list it here to inform others what we have read and what we think is important regarding French Bulldog Health concerns. If we state certain methods we have used or use on or have experienced with our own dogs, we do not wish to infringe these methods on anyone else, it is solely our opinion and nothing else. By reading, and/or using the material contained herein,  reader or user of this information fully understands the above and again agrees to utilize this information at your own risk.


 
 

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